Plenty of great food bloggers post low oxalate recipes without realizing it.  Other bloggers post recipes that are easily tweaked to be low oxalate or “lower” medium oxalate.  In this new series, I will introduce you to some of these bloggers and provide you with links to their low oxalate recipes so you can check them out yourself (just click on the recipe title).  I hope this series will also give you the confidence to start finding and tweaking recipes on your own.  Please read my description about the recipe before running over to check it out, however, because each one needs at least one simple change in order to be low or “lower” medium oxalate.

Soft Serve Banana Ice Cream

(Gluten-free, casein-free, vegan and “lower medium” oxalate, could also be used on a controlled carbohydrate diet)

This recipe is from Choosing Raw–a popular vegan, raw foods blog.  It makes a simple, creamy frozen treat that your kids will love (and hey, so will you!).  It’s a guilt-free pleasure with no added sugar.  If you want to experiment, try adding some frozen strawberries, pineapple, mango or vanilla extract.  Just remember that the bulk of your recipe must be bananas or it won’t get the creamy texture.  Also, remember chocolate is high oxalate, so don’t use Gena’s  chocolate sauce.  See my white chocolate sauce recipe at the bottom of low oxalate banana splits, instead, or opt to put sliced strawberries on top.

Oxalate Note:  If you skip the chocolate sauce, this recipe only has one ingredient — bananas, a “lower medium” oxalate treat)

Stuffed Squash

(Gluten-free, casein-free and low to “lower medium” oxalate depending on how you modify it, could also be used on a controlled carbohydrate diet)

Kim’s fabulous blog, Gluten Free Real Food,  is full of great gluten free recipes.  Some are low oxalate.  Many more are easily modified to be low or medium oxalate.  I tried this squash dish with fresh picked butternut squash, red pepper and tomatoes from my garden two nights ago and my family loved it!  You should leave out or reduce the amount of black olives (about 22 mg. oxalate per 1/2 cup) or let the non-low oxalate dieters add them at the table.  You may also want to use less tomato if you are very oxalate sensitive (most tomatoes are medium oxalate) or use a lower oxalate variety of tomato (like Georgia Peach or Early Girl).  When I made this dish I used the full amount of tomato but left out the black olives.

Apple-Turnip Chicken Salad

(Gluten free, casein free, low oxalate with modification, good for a controlled carbohydrate diet)

This recipe is from the blog, Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free, Sugar-Free.  Angie’s website is beautiful and horribly tempting with way too many high oxalate dishes.  But if you can be strong and sift through the numerous high oxalate treats, you will find a few low oxalate gems.  When you check out this recipe, just skip the chicken stock part in the narrative–this has too many high oxalate veges in it–and jump down to the recipe for Apple-turnip chicken salad.  I used a pink lady apple, a yellow onion, and two fresh turnips.  It was yummy and crunchy, but be sure to leave out the walnuts (walnuts have about 46 mg. per half cup)! Also, make sure to use gluten free Dijon mustard if this is important to you.  I ate this salad on a bed of low oxalate lettuce and greens, but you might also try topping  cucumber “crackers” for a truly low oxalate treat.